Our Waste Is Not Wasted

Monica McLendon

 

White Oak Pastures is a multifaceted regenerative farm raising ten different species for meat, with cattle and poultry as the largest in number. Only 55% of the cow is made up of cuts that are marketable. Because we are committed to adhering to our no-waste tenet, we were motivated to find ways in which to use the parts of the animals that aren’t consumed. Jacqueline DeWitt, our composting manager, explains the aspects of our composting program:

“In our system, we render fat from the cattle to make soaps and salves, sell trim to processors, tan hides, make pet chews, and feed our guardian dogs. Even after all of these measures are taken to use all parts, there are still 4 million pounds of animal remains each year that we can not process or use. So, we do the next best thing: We...

Ecological Outcome Verification Program

White Oak Pastures Team

The Ecological Outcome Verification (EOV) Program is designed to allow farms that are practicing, or are beginning to practice, regenerative agriculture techniques in order to monitor the progress in transitionary stages of their pastures.

Gardening For Biodiversity

White Oak Pastures Team

Organic Garden Manager, Bilal Sarwari, brings a mindfulness for biodiversity and environmental stewardship to our vegetable production. Our gardens provide local, organic produce to our on-farm restaurant, farm staff, and General Store customers. Bilal offers an in-depth explanation of some of the ways he encourages biodiversity and sustainability in his daily garden management.  

Livestock as Landscapers

Laura Mortelliti

We use animal impact daily to improve the health of our soils and forage. However, we also use our livestock as landscapers. We frequently use our goat herd to clear shrubbery from vacant lots in downtown Bluffton. If you have visited the farm store, you’ve likely driven by our goats hard at work. This March however, we have been busy with and excited to used our cattle to help clear some of our newly acquired land.

During this month, our cattle moved through the pecan orchard and several of our new, overgrown vacant lots. They grazed what they could, but we insured they had adequate nutrition by supplementing them with our high quality, organic haylage. The more woody and fibrous plant matter which cattle are not evolved to digest- they viewed as a playground. Our cattle clearly...

The Land and The Herd

White Oak Pastures Team
"THE LAND AND THE HERD ARE MEANT TO LAST FOREVER".

The land and the herd [or flock, or drove, or mob] are meant to last forever. If they are left unravaged, the land and herd will thrive. If they are given a little care, the land and herd will improve, every year, in perpetuity.

Pig Paddocks

Laura Mortelliti

Ignite the Consumer Revolution for Regenerative Agriculture

Angela Huffman

Meet Mary, Queen of Brussels (Sprouts)

Angela Huffman

As we kick off the Fall season of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, we are excited to introduce you to one of our organic garden managers, Mary Bruce! We love the way Mary involves herself in so many different functions at White Oak Pastures: she’s also a leather craftswoman, a biodiesel chemist, and she oversees our pastured rabbit and honeybee programs. She is smart, engaged, and always has great ideas for making improvements on the farm. Meet Mary, and catch up on what she’s up to this Fall!

The secrets of the ancient Kolomoki Mounds

Angela Huffman

The Kolomoki Mounds site is the largest and oldest tribal mound complex east of the Mississippi. Located just west of White Oak Pastures outside Bluffton, Georgia, these eight mounds were hand-built by some of the earliest inhabitants of the area, the Swift Creek and Weeden Island cultures. Building these mounds was a monumental task, toting dirt one basketful at a time. The largest mound, the size of a football field at the base and 56 ft high, required more than two million basket loads of soil.

Good news: We bought 250 acres of worthless land

White Oak Pastures Team

It takes more than time to restore Georgia’s soil to the way it was before industrial farming practices added chemical fertilizers and pesticides and removed the biodiversity and nutrients. It takes us buying the land in the first place. Well, check that box, to the tune of 250 acres.

1 2
Want more? Get In The Moment updates from the farm as they happen.


Subscribe To Our Blog



Recent Posts


'In The Moment' Updates


Popular Recipes