A Tale of Two Brothers

Will Harris

The power of animal impact: a side by side comparison of grazed versus ungrazed pasture

Once upon a time, there was an industrial commodity farmer who had two sons.

The father and his two sons worked together to produce corn and soybeans in a monoculture. They rotated the two crops year after year on their land, with the fields either dedicated to corn, or to soybeans. This sort of farming practice is called a Monoculture, and it flies in the face of the Natural Systems under which Our Earth evolved. Nature Abhors a Monoculture.

Kolomoki Mounds

White Oak Pastures Team

There's a little strip of land down here in Bluffton that we call "The Bluffton Ridge". It's about 15 miles long, and just a few hundred yards wide. It's where the Appalachian Mountains have gone underground, and combined with the coastal plains weather, where about 52 inches of rainfall pretty evenly throughout the year, this uneroded, incredibly rich mountain soil can provide aplenty. This little strip of land has an extraordinary history.

Less Than 15 Damn Cents

Will Harris

 

If most consumers knew what I know, they would buy their food directly from a farm.

There are a lot of good reasons to know where your food comes from.  The most obvious is that its not a good idea to put anything in your mouth unless you know where it has been.

There are also health, safety, and nutritional concerns. Consumers understand these, and they are certainly important, but there is another whole dimension that I don't think most consumers have contemplated: Consumers literally shape the world with their food dollars.  

Animal Impact: Cattle Grazing Grows Roots

Corinne Kocher

If White Oak Pastures is known for cattle, it's because cattle are our star grazers. Ruminants can cover a lot of ground, and they are the powerhouses behind our managed grazing practices. So how do we use the animal impact of cattle in our holistic land management strategy?

This is part three of a three-part series on how White Oak Pastures uses animal impact to regenerate land that was previously industrially row-cropped into productive, pastured savannah.

Animal Impact: Eating Like Our Pigs

Corinne Kocher

Hogs are known for their big animal impact. Pigs are omnivores - and nobody eats like an omnivore. Just think about how wide-ranging our own diet is! At White Oak Pastures, we use the animal impact of pigs to regenerate land and keep our soil and pastures healthy. So how do hogs fit into our planned grazing strategy?

This is part two of a three-part video series on how White Oak Pastures uses animal impact to holistically regenerate land that was previously industrially row-cropped into productive, pastured savannah. 

Study: White Oak Pastures Beef Reduces Atmospheric Carbon

White Oak Pastures Team

We know that many of our customers and supporters are aware that carbon emissions from industrialized beef production contribute a significant amount to man-made climate change. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has estimated that livestock is responsible for at least 14.5% of greenhouse gases being released worldwide. With numbers like that, conventional wisdom holds that a diet containing meat isn't compatible with climate change activism. 

With our unconventional operation, we weren't convinced that was the full story; but, then again, we're not scientists. Luckily, there are some scientists out there interested in this question as well.

Animal Impact: Our Hard-Working Poultry

Corinne Kocher

Did you know it's National Egg Day? We're not exactly sure how to celebrate, but we think we'll probably cook up some pastured eggs our favorite way for breakfast (Sunny side up? Scrambled? Poached? Hard boiled? Hard to decide, so we might make them all).

National Egg Day, of course, makes us think about our birds and everyone who works with them at White Oak Pastures. Our pastured poultry staff is the largest field crew on the farm - with good reason.

At White Oak Pastures, we are home to many different species of livestock, but we raise five species of poultry alone: chicken, turkey, duck, goose, and guinea. While, logistically, this can be challenging, leveraging multiple species is central to our land management strategy - because they all have different impact on our pastures.

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How Our Farm Reverses Land Degeneration

Will Harris

Scientists tell us that the planet that we live on was once a lifeless rock, spinning around the sun. It would have been black, and brown, and gray, with a poisonous atmosphere. It would have been incredibly hot on one side, with the water vaporized, and incredibly cold on the other side, with the water frozen solid. And, again, lifeless. [think about the pictures that we see of the surface of Mars, or the moon].

Somehow life began. I won't debate on how that occurred, but the fact that we are here makes it inarguable that it did begin. And that was the beginning of many complex and interrelated cycles that transformed the earth from a lifeless rock.

We Finally Did It: Meat the Porken

White Oak Pastures Team

At White Oak Pastures, we are always looking for ways to better the land, animals, and people. This mission doesn’t stop when it comes to looking for creative ways to serve our devoted, passionate customers. Over the last 150+ years, we’ve been breeding our cattle for their maternal instincts because we understand how important certain genetic qualities truly are. Since we started marketing meat and poultry to the end customer, we’ve also tried to select animals that have adequate marbling and other taste features. At the end of the day, we know that our customers are the ones we must please, which has kept us marching down a path to find the perfect combination breed to give customers exactly what they want: the Porken. A holy union of poultry and swine, the Porken has two claw-like...

Our Waste Is Not Wasted

Monica McLendon

 

White Oak Pastures is a multifaceted regenerative farm raising ten different species for meat, with cattle and poultry as the largest in number. Only 55% of the cow is made up of cuts that are marketable. Because we are committed to adhering to our no-waste tenet, we were motivated to find ways in which to use the parts of the animals that aren’t consumed. Jacqueline DeWitt, our composting manager, explains the aspects of our composting program:

“In our system, we render fat from the cattle to make soaps and salves, sell trim to processors, tan hides, make pet chews, and feed our guardian dogs. Even after all of these measures are taken to use all parts, there are still 4 million pounds of animal remains each year that we can not process or use. So, we do the next best thing: We...

White Oak Pastures Eggs Now Available at Whole Foods Atlanta

Jenni Harris

Look for White Oak Pastures Eggs in your local Whole Foods Market in the Atlanta area! 

Managed Grazing - The Plant Side

White Oak Pastures Team

White Oak Pastures is practicing managed grazing and is managing the goals of holistic agriculture. This requires intricate integration of livestock and pasture management. Our role as land stewards is to carefully foster conditions such that our land is regenerated, it’s bioproductivity is increased, and our animals are healthy and profitable. Now we discuss the pasture forage side of managed grazing.

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Bacon-wrapped pasture-raised chicken legs and smoked sugar-free bacon. Ecological Outcome Verified, non-GMO and Animal Welfare Certified.
Non-dairy Grassfed Beef Tallow Butter Substitute Tallow Be Thy Name. Certified Grassfed. Ecological Outcome Verified. Animal Welfare Certified.


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